Day 6 With a Bunch of Misfits @ Adelaide Fringe Festival

I decided to spend my sixth in Adelaide enjoying a slower pace.  With the majority of my day free, I explored some of Adelaide’s infamous wine regions.  However, while there, I couldn’t fully escape the Fringe Festival – I met some lovely people at the vineyards who were also traveling through Adelaide and we sparked a conversation about the best stuff to see at the Fringe.  I love advocating for the arts!

Before the day ended, I was fortunate enough to catch two Fringe events that were outstanding and fun!

THE TRAVELING SISTERS is a fun, spunky variety show performed by Brisbane artists Ell Sachs, Laura Trenerry and Lucy Fox.  Together they sing, play guitar and impersonate a variety of interesting misfit characters during a 55-minute set.  Some of my favourite misfits included a giant fat lady and an odd couple eager to celebrate anyone’s birthday by distributing pork pies.  I found this show charming, silly and fun as the sisters left me with a massive smile on my face that remained for several hours after the show. 

In the mid-1990s, director Danny Boyle created the cult-classic film, Trainspotting based on the novel by Irvine Welsh.  Scottish theatre company In Your Face Theatre now brings the gritty story about a group of heroin addicts coping with the economic depression in Edinburgh to the stage in TRAINSPOTTING LIVE.  Living up to their name, In Your Face Theatre present a show that really emerges their audiences into the middle of the action on stage. 

Staged in a unique venue located in the heart of Adelaide’s CBD, TRAINSPOTTING submerges its audience, with the use of strobe lighting, haze and glow sticks, into the underground world of raves and misfit angst.   Before the start of the show, there are signs posted everywhere that warn the audience the use of these theatrical effects, plus the use of heavy adult language, sexual references and drug use. 

The most impactful element throughout the performance is the actors’ ability to include the audience within the story: they naturally converse, stumble and share (or rather smear) costumes and props all over audience members.  This demonstrates to the audience that there is no escaping the dark, grotesque and aggressive execution of this performance and the realness of this consequential drug world.

Exciting news: TRAINSPOTTING LIVE is touring Australia!  The production will next stop in Melbourne for a month-long residency at fortyfivedownstairs.  Then, they will stop in Brisbane before making its way back the UK.  Do yourself a favour by making sure you see at least one of these performances in an Australian city near you!

For more information about these productions, or to purchase tickets, please visit the Adelaide Fringe Festival website.

Spectacular Highlights (and some low-lights) From My Fifth Day @ the Adelaide Fringe Festival

Day five at Adelaide Fringe, and the experiences continue to impress.  Here’s a breakdown of highlights from my day:

Who says artists can’t have it all?  South Australian superstar, Joanne Hartstone proves that artists can do it all – perform, produce and direct multiple events within a festival season – in her one-woman show THE GIRL WHO JUMPED OFF THE HOLLYWOOD SIGN.

THE GIRL WHO JUMPED OFF THE HOLLYWOOD SIGN gives Hartstonea platform to showcase her multi-talented capabilities.: not only does she superbly embody the character Evelyn Edmonds, a young Hollywood wanna-be starlet, but she also sings classic jazz tunes from the 1940s.  With a voice that sounds similar to that of the greats Judy Garland and Jean Harlow, Hartstone commands the attention of her audience throughout the nostalgic performance.

If you are looking to support a solid South Australian artist who gives audiences bang for their buck, I highly recommend catching Joanne Hartstone in THE GIRL WHO JUMPED OFF THE HOLLYWOOD SIGN.  Likewise, I recommend some of her other festival events: WE ARE ANONYMOUS, BLINK and NUCLEAR FAMILY, which were reviewed earlier this week.

Poking fun at one’s own culture as a way of building an understanding between two different cultures comes with boundaries and risks.  However, Angela Yeoh’s RUNNY MONEY finds that balance graciously while paying homage to her own roots in Chinese culture.

Throughout the show, Angela sheds light on quirky stereotypes of the Chinese culture.  According to the performance, Chinese people maintain a strong relationship with money and business, always trying to outsmart the next man with a big a idea.  It is emphasized that the importance of work is passed down to children at a very young age, and often times education is centered around business development.  At one point, Angela introduces a funny plastic machine (made in China, of course) that has the ability to scan the audience’s personal possessions on the spot in order to predict its value.  Based on these values, we receive our economic social status and then are given certain privileges.  

That is only one of many hilarious and interactive moments presented by Angela Yeoh in RUNNY MONEY.  Without giving too much more away, I highly recommend anyone to see this hilarious comedy showcase.  It is stressed by Angela that the work is still in the creative development phase; however, this performance has a solid foundation with potential for greatness!

Speaking of comedy, award-winning character act, Neal Portenza, returns to Adelaide Fringe to present a new work in development, which allows him to be as zany, spontaneous and interactive as ever before.  While making up skits and trying out new punch lines on the spot, performer, Josh Ladgrove showcases his ability to think quickly and fearlessly stumble through authentic comedy routines.  His genuine approach to his audience and comedy is a shining example of his own philosophy, “Art is not art if there is a chance for destruction.”

Unfortunately, not everyone understands Ladgrove's comedy.  During last night’s performance, a heckler kept egging Ladgrove to erupt in anger and break focus from the performance.  Instead, like a comic champ, Ladgrove gracefully accepted the annoying heckler, stating that he appreciated their random spouts of negative feedback.  The show continued with the heckler remaining in the audience until the end.

I’ve seen Neal Portenza several times at both Adelaide Fringe Festival and the Melbourne International Comedy Festival, and each performance is different.  Never disappointing.  Looking forward to catching him again at this years; Melbourne International Comedy Festival!

Unfortunately, not every event at the festival is an absolute winner.  As a fan of American playwright, Sara Ruhl, I was excited to see a performance of LATE: A COWBOY SONG presented by Lady Like Theatre Collective.  However, this production left me slightly disappointed at its cookie-cutter and lazy interpretation.

As a playwright who challenges gender roles and social norms throughout all her work, Ruhl pushes characters and environments to the edge.   Unfortunately, I didn’t see much edginess in this performance.

Amongst the many elements within the play’s writing that were missed, I did find a few choices that worked: an acoustic guitar was nicely played by the cowboy.  Using imagination and creativity for characters riding real horses the male actor is used to symbolise the horse. 

However, here are some of the missed elements, or elements that need more development, that were under-performed in this production: there was a strong lack of understanding traditional role playing between the characters; there was a lack of growth in the relationship between the cowboy and the leading lady; there also was a lack of conflict within the relationships that was spoken in between the words, especially between the cowboy and the husband. 

Hopefully, this creative team keeps working on LATE: A COWBOY SONG.  I would love to give it another chance to see it develop deeper.

For more information about these shows, or to purchase tickets, please visit the Adelaide Fringe Festival website.

Day Four: Witnessing the Significance of the Adelaide Fringe Festival

Day four was a day full of theatre events at the Adelaide Fringe Festival.  Unexpectedly, it became a day that demonstrated the significance of honouring festivals like the Adelaide Fringe – because it’s about celebrating open access for both artists and audiences.   

Being an open access festival, Adelaide Fringe does not act as a curator but instead allows any artist or group with a creative idea to participate in being apart of the 31-day arts celebration.  The creative team behind WE ARE ANONYMOUS certainly demonstrates this is a open accessibility for artists.  WE ARE ANONYMOUS is presented by Ink Spot, a South Australian youth theatre company, who showcase their understanding of the world around them.  This show sheds light on recent events surrounding the international phenomenon that was ‘anonymous,’ a group of mover and shakers wanting to change and challenge political norms around the world.  Directed by Joanne Hartstone, WE ARE ANONYMOUS is told through a large ensemble of young performers who work together to reveal the consequences of cyber trafficking.

I was thrilled to see this show because so many of the young performers have budding careers ahead of them.  They all embodied confidence, focus and passion for the story they were sharing with the audience.  Somewhere amongst the group must be the next Geoffrey Rush or Cate Blanchett! 

Another important element the Adelaide Fringe Festival celebrates is the ability for artists to develop new works and or new skills.  MIRROR is a great example.  Performer, Robbie Greenwell presents a series of characters and vignettes that showcase his talent as a character performer.  Charming moments and unique surprises sprinkle throughout the performance.  Most importantly,  at the end of the performance, Greenwell humbly asks the audience to leave feedback from their experience.  It becomes apparent that this performer remains within the creative development process and invites his audience in on the journey.

I am looking forward to seeing a future performance of MIRROR to witness the development.  For those curios about an artist’s creative process, I highly recommend checking out MIRROR. 

BLINK brings artists together in a mentorship capacity, another important element Adelaide Fringe celebrates about the artistic journey.  Established performer and producer, Joanne Hartstone works together with several emerging artists to bring British playwright, Phil Porter’s charming love story BLINK to Australian audiences.

In many ways, this production comes together to demonstrate real innovative creativity.  Performers Lucy Brewer and Gianluca I. Noble demonstrate superb character development; the set design cleverly provides layers to the staging and to the multiple environments within the scenes; music weaves in and out of the story to emphasise romantic comedy elements throughout.

BLINK is a heart warming, charming and delightful piece of theatre that showcases the hard work of emerging talent and a partnership between established and emerging artists at the Adelaide Fringe Festival.

Lastly, connecting audiences to artists in creative and interactive ways is what makes Adelaide Fringe Festival a successful celebration to the community. NUCLEAR FAMILY is a piece of theatre that does just this.  Audiences are invited to choose important outcomes that dictate how NUCLEAR FAMILY unfolds.  As audiences are put together into three groups, they are presented with two or more choices to select from that will decide the fate of the story.  Within these decisions the groups must explain why they have made these decisions, and then witness the revealing consequences.

NUCLEAR FAMILY is a fun, engaging and interesting theatrical event that allows the audience become part of the storytelling.

For more information about each of these performances, or to purchase tickets, please visit the Adelaide Fringe Festival website.

 

 

Captivated by Dynamic Performances During My Third Day @ Adelaide Fringe Festival

During my third day at Adelaide Fringe Festival, I am finding myself inspired, entertained and humbled by such dynamic performances.  Here are some highlights:

First stop brought me back to Holden Street Theatre where British playwright Henry Naylor returns to Adelaide Fringe with ANGEL.  This one-woman show continues Naylor’s exploration into Middle Eastern culture within the current conflicts around Syria and the extremist group ISIS.  ANGEL is a powerful story about heroism and the often times unexpected pathways to one’s vocation.  Protagonist Rehana, or strongly regarded as the Angel, finds herself becoming a member of the resistance regime against ISIS only after the mysterious disappearance of her father.  In a search-and-rescue adventure, Rehana in challenged to become a killer in order to protect herself and other innocent Syrian citizens.  Eventually, the thoughts and actions that keep her and her fellow men and women safe make her grow numb to the idea of being a killer.  She has accepted the fact that she must do what is right and necessary for protection.

Last year, I was fortunate enough to catch Naylor’s ECHOES at the Adelaide Fringe Festival and was excited to see his return.  My expectations were certainly met: his style of writing is unique, and quite difficult to pinpoint its exact specialty; however, I, and many others (at least it is telling within the full house at this performance) find the word captivating.  The structure of his words build an intensity which then brings you back down with funny one-liners as a means of relief.

An additional highlight to ANGEL was performer, Avital Lvova  who carries the story with vigorous passion and intense purpose.  It is clear she has immersed herself inside and out into this character, and is brave enough to encounter the intense environment at every performance.  Even while taking her final bow at the end of the performance it seems at first that she cannot shake herself from away from the role as the same glossy look in her eyes remains well into her third and fourth bows.

Next up was a deliciously spicy and witty cabaret act called FOR LOVE OR MONEY.  I couldn’t help but make reference to the 2014 movie Pitch Perfect as I joyfully watched this delightful act.  All I had on repeat in my head was: ‘It’s aca-licious!’ 

Four brilliantly talented Australian female singers, who make up the female acapella groups Ginger and Tonic, captivated mine and the rest of the audience’s hearts and spirit for a full hour as they sang, danced and Anyone who says that women can’t be funny, that it’s ‘unlady-like’ to be brazen in front of a crowd or has presented a ridiculous argument that states women are not smart will be proven wrong at this hilariously crass and empowering performance.

Ginger and Tonic sing, harmonise, write and record a mixture of original songs, parodies and covers to some of today’s popular radio hits including the genres of rap, R&B and pop.  Furthermore, each lady presents their individual business ventures, demonstrating how the service or product works and why their idea will take off sometime in the near future.  After all, these women, who may be unlucky in love, are now here for money!

Ginger and Tonic present a campy fun-loving and jaw-dropping entertainment that will make you laugh and sing along to the very end.  Click HERE to check out their website and purchase a CD of their original songs!

Across the gardens at the Royal Croquet Club was the highly anticipated return of Casus Circus.  After winning last year’s Adelaide Fringe Festival award for Best Circus or Physical Theatre Performance the Queensland circus troupe brings a new work called DRIFTWOOD.  DRIFTWOOD is the ensemble’s chance to show the audience how far we can challenge the human spirit from all kinds of directions.  By challenging human strength, these performers stack themselves on the shoulders of one another reaching several meters tall and touching the ceiling!  And they don’t limit themselves based on size and abilities – they show the audience that even the shortest stature can bare the weight of the tallest member on their shoulders, or even the weight of all team members!  Mean while, the audience watches carefully, gasping in awe.

It is evident that the biggest strength to this ensemble is its dedication to teamwork.  Every movement performed on stage is strongly supported by one another, assuring the safety and care in each stunt.  There is strong regard for patience, guidance and celebration through each trick, which severely implies that this group perhaps works, breathes and practices these routines daily with one another.

DRIFTWOOD is a majestic and lyrical, gracious return from this brilliant Queensland circus troupe. 

Lastly, within St. Peter’s Cathedral, THE DEVIL’S PASSION enriches its audience with the retelling of the life of Jesus but through the eyes of the devil who is out to disrupt God’s plans.  In an epic performance by Justin Butcher, THE DEVIL’S PASSION captivates the audience through a densely structured script accompanied by simple yet effective lighting and sound effects.   Butcher masterfully dominates the stage as he weaves in and out of each beat throughout the story; he takes a few pauses in between allowing stronger moments to rest easy or uneasy with the audience.  Butcher’s powerful voice resounds like a preacher through little assistance of a wireless microphone; this theatrical feature adds to the production’s overall epic appeal.  It is clearly evident through THE DEVIL’S PASSION that Butcher is a powerhouse performer to reckon with!

For a long fringe performance that stretches to 2 hours with a small interval, THE DEVIL’S PASSION is moving and maintains a long-lasting relationship between theatre and church.  It’s a moving piece that will certainly be remembered long after the curtain closes.

For more information about any of these performances, or to purchase tickets, please visit the Adelaide Fringe Festival website HERE.  

Stay Tuned: Reviews from My Experience at Adelaide Fringe Festival Are Coming

I've gotten into this great habit of writing helpful tips and tricks artists can use in developing clear marketing and audience development strategies.  The response and feedback from many have been incredible!  Thank you to all who have sent emails filled with encouraging words.  I am humbled by the feedback!

This week I’m going to change things up.  I am about to return to reporting on some of Australia’s most incredible independently produced artistic events.

I am so excited to be heading back to Adelaide, SA to dive into the wonderful artistic world that is Adelaide Fringe Festival.  Over 10 days, I will bare witness to such innovative, thought-provoking and note-worthy independently produced events including comedy, theatre, circus and art installations and look forward to reporting my discoveries back to you, my amazing followers.  What will I be looking for?  Everything and anything!  Whenever I experience art I find that it's important to maintain an open mind along with a willingness to join the creative ride.  I am looking to be inspired by new ideas, challenged by new perspectives and encouraged to stretch the imagination beyond reality.

Similarly, I hope to invoke curiosity by describing these wonderfully creative ideas presented by some of Australia's most notable independent artists.  Ultimately I hope my followers  feel encouraged to come experience Adelaide Fringe Festival in person.  For a complete experience, I encourage readers to follow events at the Adelaide Fringe Festival through social media - you can find Adelaide Fringe Festival on Twitter, Facebook and Instagram.

Meantime, stay tuned here because the reviews start this Friday, March 10th!

Three Tips to Focus the Art of Marketing a Festival Event

Many Australian independent artists are in the midst of festival season: Perth is half-way through its Fringe World festival, the Adelaide Fringe Festival begins approximately in three weeks, and the Melbourne International Comedy Festival commences in about two months.  What an exciting time!

I hope that by now many festival participants have begun cultivating ideas regarding marketing their event.  There are many ways to promote and inform audiences of your event, but where to begin?

Before embarking on your festival experience; even before diving into boosting social media posts, hiring a publicist or sending out emails to friend, family or subscribers; I’d like to offer three often overlooked marketing tips independent artists can use to focus a clear and simple marketing strategy for any festival event.

Read festival annual reports – Every year, festivals survey their audience members in order to collect data that will be used for an annual report.  This report highlights the turnout of the general festival experience, often including overall attendance numbers, a breakdown into audience demographics (age, profession, residency, etc.) and artist participation factors (number of participants, number of events, ticket sales revenue, etc.).  The kind of information that will be most helpful to an independent artist is the audience demographic breakdown.  Take note of the following information:

  1. The number of tickets sold throughout the festival
  2. The number of patrons who attended
  3. Residential information of patrons (locals VS regional, international or inter-state visitors)
  4. Occupation of patrons
  5. Number of artist participants and number of events

By breaking down these festival factors, an artist is able to identify how their event will cater to festival patrons.  Additionally, this kind of information will help an artist focus their efforts in executing a clear and thorough marketing strategy.

Research the venue’s audience breakdown – An artist has been assigned a venue ever since their festival application was approved.  More than likely, the venue is a space that has a regular attendance of patrons.  Familiarise yourself with the venue and its patrons.  Browse the venue website to inform yourself of previous and upcoming events.  Find out if the venue is active on social media.  If so, follow them closely to discover who they communicate with (their regulars) and how they communicate to the general public.  Additionally, initiate communication by sending an email to the venue management team: ask them questions about the space, their events and their regulars.  If they are active on social media, ask if they would be willing to share your Facebook event with their followers.  If you can, visit the venue on occasion to observe the crowd.  Your visit can also be a great opportunity to spark conversation with patrons and staff.

Focus on building a reputation – It is known that the first impression is the best impression to offer.  Build a strong reputation for yourself by creating an experience your audience will remember for a long time.  Think about ways you can make your audience feel welcomed to the space, appreciated and acknowledged for taking the time to see your work.  The emphasis should be on ways to encourage your audience to come back for more.  If you’ve created a caring, quality experience, most likely your audience will encourage others to attend your show too – word of mouth marketing sells more tickets than any other strategy!

These overlooked marketing tips can inspire, ignite and focus your festival event marketing campaign.  Most importantly these tips encourage creativity and fun, which in turn will make marketing and self-promotion feel a lot freer and easy.

Looking for assistance to devise a marketing strategy for your arts event?  Click HERE to book a FREE 30-minute consultation, and mention this article to receive 20% off any BCauseARTS marketing & audience development service.  Feel FREE, have FUN and get FOCUSED about marketing your arts practice today!

Reviews: Highlights From My Weekend Spent at Adelaide Fringe Festival

Last weekend, I traveled to Adelaide to experience both my first encounters and closing performances of the Adelaide Fringe Festival. I walked away with an even deeper passion and appreciation for the arts then ever before, and I can’t wait to tell you about what I saw. In my attempt to not make this a never-ending-story or rant, I will keep my reviews of the 11 performances I attended to a bare minimum (2-3 sentences at max for each show) to give my readers an insight into some of Adelaide Fringe’s highlighted performances:

Friday, 11th March – A day at Holden Theatre, which is a space that is as equally stunning as the performances inside it!

ECHOES

“The word is perfect but the ears of men are not.”

Poignant political insight into the parallel controversies of searching for religious purposes in modern and old-fashioned times. It was refreshing to gain a new perspective of Modern Muslim beliefs from someone outside a terrorist extreme. Beautiful performances and a well-written script caused the audience to sigh out “Hmmm” many times in agreement with captured moments of truth and revelation.

LABELS

“I want to know why it is better to let people drown than to let people in.”

Questioning society’s norms in the ways we stereotype one another based on the multiple roles we play on a daily basis (father, mother, blue-collar worker, intelligent, ignorant, cheap, bitchy, etc.), Joe Sellman-Leava is an absolutely gifted performer where his home is the stage. A simple set, a complex concept and captivating audience interactions it is hard to define Sellman-Leava as either a one-man show phenomenon or a standup trendsetter. It is no wonder this performer won 5-star reviews from local publications.

A GAMBLER’S GUIDE TO DYING

An endearing personal tribute to a family hero, Gary McNair pays homage to his storyteller granddad who taught him that everyone has a purpose in life to be remembered. McNair justifies that he continues the family gift as storyteller in this remarkable performance that charmed, touched and inspired the audience to enjoy the truth and lies of your loved ones, for in the end it doesn’t matter which end is up.

Saturday, 12th March

GREMLINS

A true representation of gypsy touring theatre, GREMLINS is a zany, family-friendly, laugh-out-loud show that leaves you either questioning your overall sanity or you’re saying: “I dunno what the hell just happened, but I liked it!” Performed under an outdoor tent at the Garden of Unearthly Delight, four actors covered in green makeup and dressed in battered, mis-matched take their audience on one of their latest 28% reliable budget airline flights. The catch? The plane is totally inoperable. Remarkable commitment to each character and the relationships to each other. GREMLINS received the opportunity to add an additional performance during their run and it was well deserved!

Outside of the Gremlins' tent!

Outside of the Gremlins' tent!

ELEANOR’S STORY: AN AMERICAN GIRL IN HITLER’S GERMANY

Another tribute performance to an elderly relative, ELEANOR’S STORY is based on the true events of the performer grandmother who grew up as an American citizen in Germany during World War II. She relives the experience of witnessing a shift in the community’s attitude and physical adjustments made as Nazi flags took over the skyline. In general, a solid performance but would have suggested a bit more tweaking in the direction as the actor was lost on stage outside of lighted areas, and important moments were missed due to obstruction from other audience members seated in front. Regardless, ELEANOR’S STORY received a standing ovation at this last performance, a humbling experience for the actor who admitted to performing at Adelaide Fringe last year to two people per performance. I hope she continues to come back with more wonderful work in the future.

BILL CLINTON HERCULES

Imagine the opportunity to witness former US President, Bill Clinton give an encouraging speech that reflects the important life lessons he learned during his governmental career. Actor Bob Paisley performed just that! Imagined as a TedTalk, Paisley portrays former US president Bill Clinton as a humble man passionate to support his wife in her current presidential pursuits and recalls his missteps along his political career path. Paisley is so convincing as Clinton that at times my eyes and ears led me to believe that I was actually listening to the former president in a rare speaking engagement opportunity. I was elated to hear the news of this show continuing a tour after Adelaide, where a future performance will actually occur in Clinton’s hometown of Little Rock, AR!

Sunday, 13th March

MOVIN’ MELVIN BROWN

A decent gospel performance sprinkled with mediocre tap dancing, this one was a hit with an older generation. Set inside Flinder’s Street Baptist Church, Brown charmed his way into the hearts of his audience members by singing his favourite and original gospel tunes, praising the positive love from Jesus Christ for all. His backup band might have felt otherwise as I observed members sending body language signs of laughter and eye-rolling behind Brown’s back – there was strong evidence to believe that these musicians were not Brown’s original band mates, minus the overpowering backup singer (probably his wife). Adorable to witness smiles of joy spread on the older generation audience members – at least this performance was someone’s cup of tea.

BEOWULF: THE BLOCKBUSTER

A grandfather genuinely tries to pass on a valuable lesson to his grandson about bravery and perseverance through his heroic take of the classic story, Beowulf. An incredible ability to colour the stage with multiple characters Irish actor, Bryan Burroughs best showcases his raw talent in physical theatre and movement throughout this performance.

UNDERNEATH BY PAT KINEVANE

I walked away from this performance saying to my partner, “I cannot describe what I just saw but I LOVED every moment of that performance.”

A corpse emerges from the shadows on stage and holds conversation with the audience reliving its living experience. We find out that this corpse was actually a young girl found burnt to a crisp when her body was found and laid to rest. Filled with voice-over dialogue, sound effects, lighting transitions that ensured shadow changes and audience interaction to subtly remind us we are all connected to one another, living or dead, Pat Kinevane supplied a true artistic Fringe performance. I DO want to see more of his works!

FUEGO CARNAL

My Fringe sidekick, Will and I outside Adelaide’s Oval.

My Fringe sidekick, Will and I outside Adelaide’s Oval.

A circus act that pumped it up through and through, Fuego Carnal gave its audience heat, passion and an appreciation for the focus and physical sacrifices needed to put on a true circus show. Screams of appreciation frequently rang throughout the circus ring after each physical stunt was done by the performers. Time flies when you are having fun, for what seemed like only 20 minutes, the show lasted for its entire 50-minute guarantee. Audience members of all ages were able to enjoy a traditional circus performance set literally under a big-top (an outdoor tent space) within the Gluttony Gardens!

In conclusion, if you haven’t ventured your way to an Adelaide Fringe Festival weekend, or even a day, please do yourself a favour and GO! Or better yet, I hope these shows make their way to the 2016 Melbourne Fringe Festival! Regardless, I had such a great time during my experience of Adelaide Fringe that I plan on making it an annual trip in my calendar. I can’t wait to met more artists, witness amazing talent and be mesmerised by the growing size of this Australian festival.

Upcoming Opportunities to Support Independent Artists

Did you know there are some AMAZING opportunities to support independent Australian artists currently going on? To send you some inspiration on what to do this week and beyond, here’s a breakdown of what I am looking forward to:

Tuesday, 8th March: Continuing the Festival of Light and Art, Theatre Works, Black Hole Theatre and Duda Pavia Company present an Australian premier of BLIND. This solo work from internationally renowned dancer/puppeteer Duda Pavia showcases a rich theatrical tapestry of a dance, puppetry, audience interaction, sound and light creating a funny, moving and powerful performance. BLIND sheds light on childhood experiences of a young boy suffering an undiagnosed debilitating illness that renders him temporarily blind, and surprising discoveries throughout his search for healing.

Thursday thru Monday, 10th – 14th March: In its final weekend of performances, the Adelaide Fringe Festival has been bringing life to the small town for the past three weeks. During my first visit, I have packed my weekend to see three to four performances a night including theatre, cabaret, comedy, circus, and magic. During the light hours, I will be making my way to visiting visual exhibitions and participating in interactive events. Look out for reviews from all performances and events next week!

23rd March – 17th April: the Melbourne International Comedy Festival celebrates its 30th birthday by bringing
national and international comedians/comediennes together for a full three-weeks of golden entertainment. As one of the three largest festivals in Australia, the Melbourne International Comedy Festival keeps on expanding, and this year is no exception. With new venues, more late-night performances and comedy catered to anyone’s taste the festival will surely be a banging 30th birthday bash! Have you picked up your copy of the program yet? If not, get on it and start highlighting the shows that intrigue you!

So don’t wait! With so many opportunities to support Australian independent artists, I would hate for you to miss out. These artists look forward to entertaining you!

For more information about the Festival of Light and Art, visit www.fola.com.au.

For more information, or to purchase tickets to BLIND, visit www.theatreworks.org.au.

For more information, or to book tickets to the Adelaide Fringe Festival, visit www.adelaidefringefestival.com.au.

For more information, or to browse the Melbourne International Comedy Festival program, visit www.comedyfestival.com.au.